Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Coming - My First Novel - "Igorotdo: The Warrior Within"

Follow Alex, an American Igorot, through the biggest adventure of his life.  In my first novel, "Igorotdo: The Warrior Within," readers will learn about Igorots, the importance of one's heritage and having a purpose-filled life while being entertained with adventure, action and romance.   

Find out more about my first upcoming novel in the "Upcoming Novel" tab.  







54 comments:

  1. I really like the title. It is very intriguing. I hope the book will be available in the Philippines.

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  2. I am a "Filipino American" and find your book interesting. From what you described in your comments, I guess I am the perfect example of a second gen Filipino gone American. I have no idea what an Igorot is, but I will do some research. I will be going to the Phillipines next month. Maybe I can meet an Igorot. My upcoming trip has had me thinking alot lately about how I will fit in there b/c I don't even speak Tagalog or understand it. I'm in my thirties and kinda feel uncomfortable being around "real filipinos". Sound like I might relate to your book (I hope). Best of luck Mr. Delson.

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  3. good luck! you make us very proud :)

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  4. AGBIYAG TI KAIGOROTAN!

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  5. i hope i will be able to get a copy of this...i am working in dubai uae and i know that some of the igorots here are interested too..more power to you God bless and good luck...

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  6. am sure quite a number will be interested in your book and relate with it.. in fact, even here in the Philippines many are going through the journey of Alex... so near yet so far from their heritage... will advertise the book over here too. Just get them ready... Owitte is coming home by OCtober, ipaw-it mo ken sha

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  7. To Mr. J Sarmiento...all you have to do is have a trip to the Highlands in the Philippines, that is in the Cordillera Region particularly Baguio City as it is the most popular one being the Summer Capital of our Country.
    And to the upcoming book...i hope to get hold of one. I'm proud to be from Bauko, Mt. Province where the author originally hails.

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  8. I think a lot of people may be relate to this book other than Filipinos. I'm sure there are other ethnic Americans who do not know their roots - Greek,Italian,German,Irish, etc...because they have been Americanized. I don't think there any books out there that describes the native Igorot tribes from the Philippines.

    This sounds like it could even be makings for a great movie! Good luck and hope you have lots of inquiries from several publishing companies!

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  9. We are very proud being Baukonian/Igorot. Looking forward on that. Keep up brod. God bless.

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  10. I am a black American with a French name. I wish I knew more about my ancestors but there are no records beyond the time we were taken here as slaves. Consider yourself lucky if you are able to connect with your ancestors. My wife is filipino. I am more interested to find out how the book addresses our purpose in life since this is a unaversal question everyone has regardless of ancestor background.

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  11. A lot of filipinos specifically igorots here in canada are waiting for the book to be released and giving you our all out support for this book that could probably explain to the younger generations here our culture, heritage, values and practices that are worthy to preserve and nourish. Thank you.

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  12. Cool....we could post it here in Canada for our kailians na taga-Montanosa....I will buy that for my son....

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  13. Greetings from United Kingdom!

    This reminds me of the book "Ghost soldiers" and the movie "The great escape". Read it and watch it in preparation for this incoming Novel about us Igorots.

    Franklin Domingo
    England

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  14. beautiful, i wish a had such a talent to write about my native country romania and its people like this author did. it is a noble thing to write and let people know about the wonder of distant places that tourists do not usualy go because they are not special but they are very special in someone's heart. florica negreanu

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  15. I am 1/4 Igorot, 1/2 Filipino (Tagalog) and 1/4 Irish mixed with Scottish. I have always kept the fact that I have Igorot blood a secret not so much because of shame but because there is so much ignorance about Igorots. I think the majority of Westerners don't know what an Igorot is so their ignorance is okay with me, but "my experience" with Filipinos have taught me that there is much they don't know about Igorots. I got tired of dealing with eyes rolling or replies like, "really, you don't look like an igorot (when in fact I do despite my Irish blood)" when I tell Filipinos I am part Igorot. It's as if Igorots are a "lesser" or "inferior" people with "many" Filipino (again, my experience). Mr. Delsons articles have sparked a renewed pride in being part Igorot. I hope this book does something about the igonrance out there.

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  16. To Mr. Franklin Domingo: Have you read the book already? Is the book and movie you mentioned relevant to this book? I know the book "gost soldiers takes place in the Philippines", but the movie with Steve Mcqueen has nothing to do with the Philippines. Just curious.

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  17. From black Americans, Romanians, Filipinos, Igorots and anyone else - Knowing where we come from is important. Even Jesus said something like, "Even if I give witness about myself, my witness is true, because I have knowledge of where I came from and where I am going."

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  18. Great scripture quote Roy! Did you know Jose Rizal (Filipino national hero) also said,

    "HE WHO DOES NOT KNOW HOW TO LOOK BACK AT WHERE HE CAME FROM WILL NEVER GET TO HIS DESTINATION?"

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  19. my heritage is the human race. being aussie with so much mixed blood only confuses me. i am happy just being a child of god.

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  20. this is indeed a great news to all of us interested specially for us igorots or cordillerans. we, here in united Kingdom are surely looking forward for this book to come out.

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  21. Your book should be an awakening light to all Igorots and all Filipinos as well worldwide. I am a half bloodied Igorot who came here to the US when I was 5 years old 25 years ago. I am seeing myself in what you have been through. I would definitely recommend your book to my own family and friends. Thank you for writing this book about Igorots to make us feel very proud of who we are!

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  22. To Roy Garcia : You are totally right ! This book should be an educational tool for everyone about Igorots because I myself don't know much about the Igorot culture although my mom is half Igorot. Thank you Mr.Delson for your "wake up call" !

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  23. @ all those non-igorots who commented & read this: I'm so glad you take interest in this because I hope to speak out to ALL ethnic groups who face the challenges of staying connected to their roots here in America (and elsewhere for that matter).

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  24. @ Frankiln . . . an Igorot with a British accent? .. . Cool! I'm pleasantly surprised you mentioned the two WWII related topics, though I don't know how you arrived at their relativity. This is not a book solely about WWII, but it does include two fictional accounts of two historic events in the PI during WWII (alot of action). . .

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  25. @ Peter Badeau . . . I'm glad you brought up your interest in the "life's purpose" aspect of this book. It is actually the main topic of the book. The "connecting to our roots" aspect is a major aspect, but secondary to the main topic. Also, your marriage with an Igorota interests me greatly because all my sisters are married to non-Igorots/Filipinos. This is America, and it's melting pot will inevitably present a plethora of identity issues for our future generations . . . which is why I feel it is more important to know our purpose. If we can stay connected to our roots at the same time . . . even better:)

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  26. To everyone thus far . . . THANK YOU for visiting this blog. I am deeply touched by your votes, comments and personal emails/fb messages! IYAMAN, yaman, salamat, gracias, arrigato and so on!

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  27. I anxiously await your book! If your book is anything like what you have writen so far, I will be sure to buy several copies (for myself, freinds, and family). You are proving Filipinos can do more than box and nurse (lol).

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  28. A True Proud FilipinoSeptember 12, 2010 at 1:09 PM

    Go ahead and teach your own people about your heritage, but if this book is attempting to portray igorots as equals to real filipinos I think this is a stupid thing. There is a reason why igorots are barely covered in our educational books in schools in the philippines. It's because they are not worthy of the filipino name. You pride yourselves as not being conquered by Spain, but I pride myself as being conquered by Spain because without them my ancestors would have stayed uneducated and uncivilized and there would be a nation of people still running around in loin clothes today. But thanks to Spain, we are now educated, smart, civilized and even better looking today. You don't see igorots on the popular filipino shows today do you? When it comes to great minds like Rizal or big achievers like Pacquiao, you won't find Igorots. I rest my case.

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  29. @ "A True Filipino" . . . WOW. My first reaction was to delete your comment, but I decided not to because its sheer IGNORANCE is an ugly, yet real, feeling that you and others like you might have. I will leave it at that because your comments do not deserve any more of my time.

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  30. @"A True Filipino"... obviously you are not as educated as you may think you are (Should we blame Spain for that??) LOL... A true Filipino does not know ignorance nor racism... A true Filipino prides himself of who he is, his ancestors, their family values and culture... whether you're from the mountain, the lowlands, or the city... PINOY TAYO!

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    1. BEING A TRUE HUMAN BEING U MEAN?..D AMERICANS 1 OF D MOST SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE IN D WORLD NEVER PRIDE THEMSELVES SO MUCH AS BETTER THAN ANY RACE IN D WORLD INSTEAD THEY WELCOME MANY MIGRANTS ALL OVER D WORLD INCLUDING D PHILIPPINES..D JAPANESE NO.2 RICHEST COUNTRY N D WORLD BUT ARE NOT KNOWN 2 BE PROUD PEOPLE...I THINK U BETTER CHECK UR EGO HO EVER U ARE.

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  31. Rex, Glad you didn't delete it because “A True Filipino” has a point and it's wrong, but a point nonetheless. The point “A True Filipino” was trying to explain, as you have already eloquently described, is he is very ignorant.

    I’ll give a little time for you, Rex, because ignorance should not go unchecked.

    @ "A True Filipino"

    You believe in the stuff in textbooks. Who wrote those textbooks? Who are the publishers? Who buys them? What schools are you going to? I'd like someone to tell me something "true" from any textbook from any country. I'd like someone tell me something "true" a teacher has told you.

    You think people in loincloths aren't educated. It's "those" people in loincloths (a.k.a. your ancestors) that have made the Pilipino (notice the P) who they are. It's Spain that decided they were right and the Pilipinos were wrong. Or did you forget that the Holy Roman Empire, the Moorish Muslims, and then the Christians conquered the almighty Spain. Who's to say who's right?

    Do you think the Philippines would be better off being conquered again and "educated" a little more? Shoot, even Hitler was a pretty smart guy to convince so many people what he thought was right, but he was too jacked up to realize how wrong he was.

    "A true Filipino", you say the Igorots are second-class to “true Filipinos”. It sounds like you still have black slaves on your cotton plantation. (That's United States of America history. I don't know where you're from.)

    I won’t even get into media. All I have to say to that is you just put education and reality TV shows on the same level. WOW… (You must have not seen how Venus Raj answered her question during the Miss Universe 2010 pageant. http://j.mp/bdCkwd I don’t think she’s Igorot.)

    Since you’ve rested your case. I won’t look forward to a response.

    But if anyone else feels like they’re a “true Filipino” go right ahead and respond. It’s too bad that “A True Proud Filipino” pretty much commented anonymously. We can only assume you’re a male since you didn’t put “Filipina”. That anonymity doesn’t give much validity to your comment, is oxymoronic to hide and standing up for what you believe, and if you do respond again, nothing you say is worth two cents since you seem to have it all figured out by resting your case. Maybe you’ll just respond under another name like, “A “Really” True Filipino” and then “A “Really” True Ultra-Super-Megazord Filipino”. (Now I'm just being obnoxious).

    In other words, don’t hide behind your computer monitor thinking you’re smart.

    Joseph Camara
    (joseph at josephcamara.com)

    PS
    I’m the furthest from smart or educated because I signed with my real name. I’m just not hiding.

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  32. congrats, Rexcrisanto - for writing this book and will look forward to having a copy. It will be an inspiration to your fellow Igorots, and an educational resource for most Pinoys who do not know much about the people in the highlands of the Cordilleras. That photo of pinikpikan reminds me of our visit to your place in Chicago years back, when your parents prepared pinikpikan for that delicious meal... you were a small boy then. Keep up the good work, and write some more.

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  33. Okay dude (so-called "True Proud Filipino), totally uncalled for. My non-Igorot friends (1 -Tagalog, 2-Polynesian, 1-Cambodian) just finished laughing at your comment. It's so ridiculous and stupid that we couldn't get mad. No, we just laughed. On a serious note (though I am serious about our laughter), my tagalog friend admits that there is little known about us Igorots other than the typical stereotypes (of which are mostly wrong), and he grew up in Cebu. The same is true with the Datu and other smaller minorites, but it's not because we or other minorities are lesser or inferior than the majority. The fact that President Aquino gave the Igorots their own government to make their own decisions & laws (except for declaring war and other major things like the national currency), means that the government in general does not see us as inferior. And about this whole good looking thing goes, I don't watch The Filipio Channel and others primarily because it sends the same message as you do by using mestizas to represent beauty. That's just wrong. There is something wrong with our culture (filipinos as a whole) when our people start looking at themselves and comparing their god given beauty to Latino beauty. Why can't we be like the Korean, Chinese, Japanese - all of whom use their typical features to represent beauty. Anyway, I hope this book educates (even in a fictional way as I understand it to be) people about Igorots in a good way.

    Rexcrisanto, seriously dude, we Igorots are like the native Aborigonal people of Australia who need a "Crocodile Dundee" figure to share our culture to the world. Don't focus on Filipinos alone. There is a whole world out there who don't know Igorots even exist. Don't let people like this discourage you. Keep writing, you Crocodile Igorot! he he he (laughing again as you should)

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  34. @ "A True Filipino" - Have you realized how much you made yourself a laughingstock? You have clearly forgotten your history. Let me point out to you that during the Spanish regime in the Philippines, proper formal education was deprived of the Filipino's because they were merely regarded as servants and low class creatures and thus never been given the right to get educated. Not until the Americans built there base in the Philippines that formal system of education was introduced and established. Insolence, my friend, is the worst crime to be ever committed by anyone, and I hope you'll be able to forgive yourself for committing one.

    @ Rex, keep on writing and sharing. The Igorots worldwide got your back...

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  35. Sal Gonzales - another real filipinoSeptember 13, 2010 at 6:57 PM

    Have you ever noticed how Igorots have so much confidence when together in their small groups? But when they are individually mix in with Filipinos, they become timid and shy. That's because they know deep down they aren't as good as us Tagalog filipinos.

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    1. Hey, Sal, what are you good at?

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  36. @ Anonymous (describing the Spanish regime, depriving Filipinos' education)

    Thanks for reminding us of how Spain didn't want to educated, but the total opposite, put us in servitude, removing us of our liberties.

    I remember as a child in elementary school (circa 1990's) and searching through the enormous dictionary in our school library podium for "filipino". I vividly remember it saying, "domestic servant". I had no idea at the time why, but now I see where it comes from.

    Mr. "A True Proud Filipino" I hope you realize how wrong you are AND admit it.

    My friend was explaining to me that in Japan their textbooks and whole education system pretty much leaves out everything that happened in World War 2. If "A True Proud Filipino" lived there he would probably also believe that the Japanese didn't do anything during that time. Those textbooks don't tell about the stories like my Lola used to describe to me. She said the Japanese lined up Filipinos front to back and would try to save bullets by shooting the person in the back of the line and killing everyone to the front. But, you know, because it wasn't in a textbook, it never happened. I'm sure a lot of Japanese are trying to move forward from that crazy time.

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  37. I hated living in Germany because we Pinoy were always looked down on by the Germans. Every time my kababayans and I got together for parties we exchanged experiences of discrimination. We often wanted to tell the Germans of our experiences expressions like "Putang @#!/*# mo! Who do you think I am? I'm Filipino not Igorot!" I don't know where this expression came from. Its just something we picked up growing up in Manila. Its like how Americans refer to the Polish in their Pollak jokes. That's just how things are.

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  38. I don't get it TDAOEY. The aborigine are still the lower class of Australia. So are the Igorot of the Philippines.

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  39. (1 of 2) Whatever happened to free speech? This is America. If you start a blog, it should be interactive and free of censorship. In your attempt to show only the positive comments, mostly from Igorots as I see it, you are in essence creating your own sense of ignorance and are in denial of the truth. The truth is, many (not all of course but "many") Filipinos share the same thoughts as the person who posted the comment that angered your readers. They just don't want to voice it out because in today's climate of political correctness, they label themselves as racists or bad.
    I have lived in America most of my adult life, but I am very much involved with Filipinos new and old to this country. As a child growing up in Manila, I recall your people (the Igorots) coming into town to show their costumes and dances for money. Each time they came, all my friends and I were told to go inside or run away from them because our parents were afraid they would do something bad to us. Call it ignorance, and yes it probably is, but this has been going on for generations and continues to carry forward each generation.
    Personally, I am not threatened by Igorots and thought of their banging of pans and costumes was cool to me as a kid, but I just don't see them as Filipinos. They are too different. This is why former President Corazon Aquino helped bring about their own autonomous government - because they are too different and should be governed by their own kind. Igorots are so differnet in culture, languege, location and such that the majority of Filipinos easily see them as non-Filipinos which leads to this feeling of “superiority,” which I don’t subscribe to. Different – yes, but inferior – no.
    Blame it on the Spanish and Western colonization of us I guess. When Spain failed to conquer the Igorots time after time, they had to convince the lowlanders (us) that the Igorots were bad, inferior, lesser, stupid and all the other bad things they probably had to say to get us to side with them. Unfortunately, this sentiment still survives today. Old habits are hard to break.
    (to continue on 2 of 2)

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  40. (2 of 2 continued)
    I have some interesting observations that I dare you to try digesting. Please don’t reject them until you had some time to push them around in your head and heart. First, try talking to the younger generation of Igorots that have fled the mountains to go elsewhere. There are so many now in Baguio, but there are more and more making their way to Manila and other major cities on and off Luzon. The ones I have seen in Manila are very fluent in Tagalog. So fluent that they have adopted it as their primary language in conversation, Friendster and Facebook. These Igorots are fitting in with the rest of us Filipinos just fine because they chose to be like us. Frankly, I take pride in this because they look up at us. Why not? Diba. They want to be like the rest of us. One young Igorot in Manila told me most of his cousins in Baguio no longer take pride in their heritage and believe it to be for the old “polks.” He said he or his cousins would never wear the g-strings or play the gongs. I even know a few Igorots in California and Canada who teach their children Tagalog and "not" their native language even though they can speak it. This is proof that we Filipinos are looked up to. Again, why not? What's the use of learning a language that 90 plus percent of Filipinos won't understand. It's pretty simple to me. Look at the popular Rosetta Stone language softwar. They have “Tagalog” as the Filipino language. Why make it difficult for kids growing up outside the Philippines?
    Lastly, if you look at the world as a whole and you ask people from all over about the Philippines and its people, the Filipinos they know most about are us lowlanders (as you Igorots refer to us), not you Igorots or even the Moros of Mindanao for that mattar. So we may not be "superior" (b/c we're not), but we are more of what makes a Filipino a Filipino than Igorots. You probably won't post this, but I want you to consider the realities in this matter because they are just that – Real (as you admit in your response to the provoking author of the comment that led to this. As one of your anonymous readers said, “PINOY TAYO!” Thank you for your time sir.

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  41. I RESPONDED TO J.RIOS' COMMENT ON TODAY'S BLOG: http://amerigorot.blogspot.com/2010/09/true-proud-filipino.html

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  42. maybe that true proud filipino got an unrequited love from an igorota...posting nasty comment to get even.lol

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  43. In response to JRios on the Igorot youth,

    I am a younger generation Igorot and as you observed, 1.) I am fluent in Tagalog/Filipino (Filipino is the politically-correct term because "Filipino"is not only Tagalog but has in the years used/borrowed other languages from other ethno-linguistic groups) 2.) I dressed like the rest of us - Filipinos - western clothing.

    First, Let me point out though that our being fluent in Filipino is the result of the usage of the language as a medium of instruction in schools nationwide. We have Filipino as a subject from elementary to university. We learned our "balarila"and "panitikan." Thus, it is not really because we look up to you and we wanted to be like you that we use the language.

    Second, we dress up like the rest of the majority Filipino. Well, culture is ever-changing and the Igorot culture is not exempt. We learn to dress just like the rest of the other people because we learn to adopt/adapt to the changing times. This is the result of commerce and common sense and again, not because we wanted to look like you. If you go to Baguio or anywhere else in the Cordillera provinces, you'll notice that Igorots have different style of dressing which to the lowlanders would claim " baduy" but we Igorots would also see your style as "maarte".

    On the context of the younger Igorots you've meet who doesn't ever want to wear a loincloth or even aknowledge their Igorot heritage, that's a personal decision/choice. Let me tell you though, that a lot of us younger Igorots and even those who are younger than I am are thrilled on the idea of wearing our traditional clothing on special occassions. We are keen on learning how to play the gongs, dance our native dances, sing our own songs.

    And as to your comments about parents not teaching their native language, I think this does not only hold true to the Igorot people but to all general Filipinos as well. There are a lot of Filipino kids here in Canada (first-geneations) who cannot speak Tagalog/Filipino because their parents did not taught them so. In the Philippines, a lot of Filipinos purposely "train" their kids to speak English at home oftentimes, resulting in the so-called Tagalog slang or "cono."

    Lastly, I've been fortunate to have meet a lot of my generation in student conferences in my university days and let me tell you that we are not as biased as those who came before us. We look at each other as equally Filipino - and it doesn't matter if you are an Igorot, Tagalog, or Mindanaoan. We actually celebrate the fact that we are different from each other. You know, if we are all the same in that little island of ours, then, there's not much excitement for all of us to start with.

    As to your claim that the world only sees your kind as "the Filipinos" well...so??

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  44. REX - CONGRATS on your up-coming novel. Something to look forward to.

    I've decided to write my own response to the negative post at my blog - see Anti-Igorot sentiments from a “true” (?) Filipino.

    You've done a good job on your blogs. Kudos to you! Keep on writing.

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  45. i am so annoyed!...I had written something longish earlier which i poured my heart into and just one push of a wrong button and it's all gone! yuck!

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  46. If your commenting on JRios' comment, please go to the "True Proud Filipino" blog to comment because I dedicated a new blog for his comments.
    Click here to go to True Proud Filipino blog.

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  47. I am leaving for the Philippines this week and it turns out I will be visiting relatives who have Igorot friends their. I am looking forward to discussing your topics with them and my uncles. I'm still having a hard time understanding why their is division within Flips. My parents aren't any help cause they think Igorots are small and black and from what I understand now, that's totally wrong. I don't know. Maybe Im just too coconut. For me there are just flips and fobs - no pun intended. ha ha.

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  48. Here we go again! Noypi Idiots who, when looked down by whites as brown monkeys; could hardly defend themselves and cry wolf. We, Igorots have our culture and tradition and proud of it...what's yours? Get a life boy!

    Rex: Your uncle Rafael (retired General) is my mentor and best friend...he's four years older than me but he's been a dear friend since 1968 during our days in Baguio, being a baguio boy myself. I heard what happened to your parents in Chicago, and I've also met your late dad in Baguio a few times when Rafael was still going to SLU. I've also met your uncle Dr Marcelino Delson several times during those years. Cheers to you and your followers. I'll be visiting every now and then.

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  49. The Igorot Malcolm XDecember 27, 2010 at 3:54 AM

    The Filipino mindset is shackled in ignorance and disdain for themselves and ignorance about their own history. A Filipino would rather look away from a mirror because he is too afraid to see that his facial features are dark. His skin comes in shades of brown and his hair is black. Not white, not blond.

    At least those few ethnic groups (such as the Igorot) in the Philippines who can still recite their own language and still remember their own legends and stories have more value than these clowns who call themselves "real" Filipinos. While you "real" Filipinos struggle desperately to become more and more like the West, selling yourselves like whores, we will be ourselves.

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    1. Hmmmn, this is an old blog but the comment above is the best. Hehehe. The mainstream pilipino mind is still clothed in ignorance, courtesy of their spanish masters. A long time ago, they gave up their lands, dignity, and identity without a fight (and they are too dammed proud of it)

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  50. very nice po ang blog ninyo. ako ay isang igorot at very proud ako sa aking cultural heritage

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  51. I will still have to read the whole thing myself . The title alone promises something that would make a difference in Cordilleran Literature that I may use to educate my students....

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